The following studies have been published by the City of Roswell.

They're a little bit difficult to track down and navigate on our city's website. So we've collected them here for you to be better-informed.

The draft of the City of Roswell fair housing report contains detailed data about Roswell's changing demographics and housing inventory. 

 

Here is a compressed file for download of the complete 2017 Public Arts Master Plan that was presented to City Council on March 27th. Public art, like other civic infrastructure, is a manifestation of our collective desire to make our community prosperous, desirable, and most importantly enjoyable for all. The Roswell Public Art Master Plan lays the foundation for the future of our public art and by extension prepares us to tell the next chapter of the Roswell story.

 

Approved by Mayor and City Council on January 22, 2003. Developed by the Roswell Redevelopment Task Force. The purpose of this Redevelopment Strategy is to examine Roswell's vacant and underutilized commercial space and surrounding residential areas in need of rehabilitation, and lo present a strategy for promoting redevelopment, including incentives, to achieve an optimal mix of uses.

Funded by the Atlanta Regional Commission and the City of Roswell, Georgia. April 2008. Amended October 6, 2008. LCI planning studies are designed to coordinate transportation improvements with land use strategies in order to promote mixed-use and mixed-income neighborhoods that provide access to a broad range of travel modes (including transit, roadways, and walkways/bikeways) and that support a balance between jobs and housing. 

Prepared by Atlanta Regional Commission Staff, November 2009. The City of Roswell was awarded funding through the Atlanta Regional Commission's (ARC) Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) program in late 2007 to study an area along Atlanta Street (Highway 9) and the Roswell Town Center. The study included extensive public involvement and took a look at current conditions and made a series of short- and long-term recommendations related to land use, urban design and transportation. All of the recommendations were supported by a complete market study of the area performed by Robert Charles Lesser and Company.

The City of Roswell was awarded funding through the Atlanta Regional Commission’s (ARC) Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) program in late 2007 to study an area along Atlanta Street (Highway 9) and the Roswell Town Center. The study included extensive public involvement and took a look at current conditions and made a series of short- and long-term recommendations related to land use, urban design and transportation. All of the recommendations were supported by a complete market study of the area performed by Robert Charles Lesser and Company.

In 2011, the City of Roswell (City) began a major transportation study in the area of Holcomb Bridge Road (HBR), also known as SR 140, at the SR 400 interchange.  As the only SR 400 interchange in the City, it serves as an important gateway to the City. This Master Plan presents an executive summary of the Holcomb Bridge Road Corridor Study. Additional technical data is included in the companion document, Technical Report.

Prepared by RKG for the City of Roswell in April, 2012. Background: Roswell’s historical land use and planning documents quickly reveal that the City has encouraged development patterns that established Roswell as a premier bedroom community with ample support services. Through the 1980s and into the 1990s, Roswell was very successful at maintaining this vision. Despite more than 14,000 single-family detached housing units and 6,500 multi-family units being built during this 20-year time period (and the resulting demand for capital investments such as recreation facilities and schools), Roswell remained an amenity-rich and fiscally healthy community. 

  • 2025 Strategic Plan (broken into parts below description)

This is an introduction to Roswell’s Comprehensive Plan 2025. It describes previous comprehensive planning efforts, the overall content and organization of the plan, provisions for amendments and updates of the plan, purposes and uses of the plan, and the citizen participation component used in initially preparing and adopting the 2020 Comprehensive Plan and the 2025 major update of the plan. (This file is quite large. We've broken it down into more downloadable files.) 

The Community Assessment and its Technical Appendix presents key data and information to help answer these kinds of questions, so that the City of Roswell’s community members and other stakeholders can prepare a vision and a 20-year plan for the future. As part of an overall, Comprehensive Plan process, the City of Roswell will create a 2030 Community Agenda defining the City’s vision, short- and long-term actions to achieve that vision, and the policy commitments to make this great City of Roswell even better over the next twenty years.

  • 2035 Strategic Plan (broken into parts below description)

Georgia’s Department of Community Affairs (DCA) requires that each local government create and maintain a Comprehensive Plan, which defines how that city or town plans to move forward with all aspects of city management from parks to economic development and from housing to transportation. These plans typically create guidance for the following twenty years of City activities. The DCA also requires that these plans are kept up-to-date, with updates at least every five years. Adoption and acceptance of a Comprehensive Plan is required for a City to have Qualified Local Government Status (QLG Status). QLG status, in turn, is required for a City to participate in a wide variety of State programs. Noncompliance could impact the City’s ability to participate in and take advantage of these grants, programs, and other funding.

 

A concise summary of the various commissioned studies in different areas of our city. The table displays the dates of the studies, concise summaries, and actions taken as a result of their implementation.

After successful revitalization of their historic commercial core, the City of Roswell has been engaged in an effort to upgrade and improve two areas: Midtown Roswell, located on Alpharetta Highway (SR 9) stretching north from Norcross Street to the commercial development of Holcomb Bridge Road and Route 9, and the Northwest Quadrant of Holcomb Bridge Road and GA-400.

This is a simple, side-by-side comparison of how land is utilized east and west of Georgia 400.

  • EastWest Alley (broken into parts below description)

In 2014, the City of Roswell Community Development Department, in an effort to support an active, safe, and economically vital historic downtown district, identified existing alleyways and side streets off Canton Street as features for study and improvement. Pond & Company was contracted to facilitate the creation of an Alley Master Plan with input from the community. This report is the result of that effort. 

Because of the recent adoption of a new Unified Development Code (UDC) and Design Guidelines, the City of Roswell has new regulatory and form-based tools to significantly enhance the visual pedestrian experience in its historic downtown district. Many of the goals and guiding principles outlined in the UDC also apply to this Master Planning effort, among which are: 

1) To promote and protect the public health, safety, and welfare. 

2) To promote environmental, economic, and social sustainability. 

3) To protect the physical environment, historic character and natural resources for all citizens 

4) To preserve, protect and enhance the City’s employment base 

5) To improve connectivity and build 

 

The Fiscal Year 2016 Approved Budget car-ries out the City’s vision by investing in those areas that are vital to the City’s strategic goals while maintaining the City fiscal strength and stability, focusing on finishing what we’ve started.

The City of Roswell is a community blessed with strong neighborhoods and a beautiful historic district. Yet, while the character and identity of individual neighborhoods and historic district are strongly defined, the City continues to search for a specific identity for its Midtown District. The intent of this study is to develop a Midtown Roswell Redevelopment Plan based on a citizen defined vision for the community. City leaders will utilize this Redevelopment Plan to influence neighborhood stability, outline commercial redevelopment strategies, document street beautification plans, and improve the traffic and pedestrian safety in the corridor. Prepared for the City of Roswell, January 6, 2003